Wednesday, March 11, 2020

buy custom Digital Forensics in the Criminal Justice System essay

buy custom Digital Forensics in the Criminal Justice System essay The main aim of conducting a search is to obtain evidence in case that there is criminal suspicion. It requires that one party feels convinced that this process would lead to gaining access to materials or content that is related to a specific crime. The law stipulates that a search should be conducted upon obtaining a search warrant from a magistrate in a court. The search is carried out by law enforcement officers in the presence of a search warrant. However, there are a few exceptions whereby a search is deemed legal even without the presentation of a warrant. The fourth amendment protects members of the society from unreasonable searches. Under the rule, a warrant should specify the place to be searched and the items that should be seized during the process (Kerr, 2015). 1. In the mentioned scenario involving Makestuff Company, Mr. Andfirums concern is that the source code for product X may land in the hands of the firms competitors, leading to a massive loss of revenue due to the theft of the companys intellectual property. The suspicions emerged due to Mr. Yourprops arrogance during the exit interview. However, conducting a search on his personal vehicle that is parked within the companys premises is beyond my mandate as the companys information security officer. The supervisor cannot do it, too, because the law stipulates that a search can only be executed by law enforcement officers. The only thing we can do is to contact law enforcement officers to carry out the process. 2. In case there is evidence of theft of the intellectual property, the firm can pursue criminal prosecution. The source code for product X is the intellectual property belonging to Makestuff Company as it was intended for use in the development of a new product. The supervisor can therefore request local police investigators to conduct a search on Mr. Yourprops personal vehicle parkd within the companys premises. The reason is that there is a high probability of finding evidence in his car thus the search would be reasonable. However, it is important for the police investigators to obtain a search warrant from a magistrates court. The warrant should specify that the car is one of the places where the search should be conducted. It must also determine the item that should be seized (Kerr, 2012). In this case, the item is the source code for product X. However, if there is not enough time to obtain the search warrant, the police may still conduct the search if there is sufficient reas on to show that the evidence may be found there. The provision is one of the exemptions to the fourth amendment. 3. In an organizational setting, the law protects the privacy of all employees against unwarranted searches at their workstations. Employers must obtain a search warrant from the relevant authorities unless there is a mutual consent between the employer and the worker regarding the search. When conducting a process, the warrant specifies its scope in terms of the persons, place and items that should be searched. The places to be searched must have a high probability of containing evidence. In this regard, it would be unreasonable for the supervisor to search Mr. Yourprops locker at the onsite gym unless there is sufficient information that he keeps his work-related items in it. 4. A search warrant should be executed in the presence of all the parties involved. For instance, if the process is to be conducted in a house, its owner must be present at the time of the search in his house or property. Similarly, it would be inappropriate to search Mr. Yourprops office desk by using a master key after he has left. The action would be similar to breaking into someones house or property and conducting a search in his/her absence. The best course of action would be to serve Mr. Yourprop with the search wwarrant. Force can only be applied if he is provided with the warrant but refuses to comply. 5. According to the companys policy, all items brought onto the firms property, inclusive those of the employees, are a subject to random searches for the companys items. The fact that Mr. Yourprop did not sign the employee handbook cannot prevent a warranted search from taking place. The reason is that it is the duty and responsibility of all employees to sign in the allocated space. Their signatures are an indication of their compliance with the companys rules and regulations. Such stipulations apply to all the employees at Makestuff without any exceptions. Mr. Yourprops argument that he failed to sign the handbook therefore is not valid and cannot inhibit a warranted search from taking place. 6. The purpose of the security checkpoint at the entrance is to ensure the protection of the companys working environment and employee safety. The security personnel at the checkpoint have the authority to seize any items that may be harmful to the firm. In this regard, the security staff at the checkpoint can be directed to search Mr. Yourprops briefcase and seize digital evidence. The reason is that the checkpoint is the main point of entry and exit into and out of the companys premises. If Mr. Yourprop is allowed to leave without being frisked, he may maliciously give the firms source code for the new product to other market players, thus causing harm to the companys financial position if the competitors use the source code to make the product. However, the corporation should begin with establishing that there is a high probability of finding digital evidence by searching his personal items at the checkpoint. The law stipulates that the scope of a search should be limited to place s that are reasonably established to be potential sources of evidence (Dharmapala and Miceli, 2012). Buy custom Digital Forensics in the Criminal Justice System essay

Monday, February 24, 2020

Consumers' surplus Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 words

Consumers' surplus - Essay Example The first major insight that students obtain from the study of microeconomics is the theory of demand and supply. Nevertheless, the demand is the willingness and ability of individuals of consumers to acquire certain goods and services. Therefore, when prices increase (assuming determinants of demand constant) the quantity demanded decreases and vice versa, thereby resulting in a downward sloping demand curve due to negative price – quantity relationship. In contrast, the supply refers to willingness and ability of sellers to produce and sell certain goods and services. Hence, when prices increase (assuming determinants of supply constant) the quantity supplied also increases because of increase in profit margin of producers and vice versa. In simple words, the supply curve slopes upward due to positive price – quantity relationship. In this paper, I would elucidate on Consumer Surplus – a theory contributed by Alfred Marshall in 1920s (and derived by using the d ownward sloping demand curve) that initially received various serious criticism by then economists and academicians. Dooley (1983, p. 26) has summarized the following major criticisms raised at that time - â€Å"First, whether an additive utility function adequately explains consumer behavior; second, whether the marginal utility of money can be treated as a constant; third, whether the quantity demanded of one commodity can be treated as a function of its price alone; and fourth, whether it is possible make interpersonal comparisons†. The researcher will first explain what Consumer Surplus theory is after which an analysis will be presented on the credibility of this theory. The researcher will conclude this paper by providing a personal opinion and will finally provide 2 recommendations to the economists and pundits. 2. Analysis / Body Consumer Surplus is a concept studied in microeconomics and it refers to the estimation of consumer utility. In simple words, consumer surpl us is the surplus portion calculated by subtracting the maximum price consumer wants to pay for acquiring a good or service with the equilibrium market price. This could also be defined as the difference between the actual paid market price and the highest price at which demand of a product exists. As illustrated in Figure 1, the equilibrium quantity and price are P1 and Q1 respectively; however, the demand of a product also exists at higher prices. Therefore, the blue portion represents consumer surplus. Figure 1 In order to fully comprehend the theory of Consumer Surplus, I would like to present an example of demand of DVDs (video games) relative to their price. In this case, let us consider that a  consumer enters in a Computer shop to buy video games. The consumer buys 10 DVDs of $50 in total but he is inclined to pay $95 for one DVD so the consumer’s surplus for 1 unit will be $45, for 2 units will be $40, for 4 units will be $30, for 6 units will be $20, for 8 units w ill be $10 and for 9th unit will be $5 only. The figure 2 illustrates the consumer surplus in green, which is below the market demand curve and above the equilibrium market price. Figure 2 Samuelson & Nordhaus (2005, p. 96) highlights the following: â€Å"Consumer Surplus is the gap between the total utility of a good and its total market value†

Saturday, February 8, 2020

The irony in An Indians Looking-Glass for the White Man Essay

The irony in An Indians Looking-Glass for the White Man - Essay Example   The paper tells that William Apess was a Native American who accepted the Christian faith. He continued to labor among the Native American Indians as a Christian minister and advocated human rights in his sermons and writings. The period in which he wrote marked an age of cruel slavery and anti-miscegenation laws which prohibited the intermarriage between Whites and Colored people. Apess uses the notable technique of irony in which he would expose the hypocrisy of the Whites employing their own religious doctrines and ideologies.  The superficiality of the White man's doctrine is a point of argument in Apess' work. Apess observes that one "may learn how deep (the White man's) principles are...I should say they were skin deep." The foundation of the White man's objection to the non-Whites enjoyment of their inalienable human rights is based on the skin tone. Skin pigmentation or exterior is not of value in any substantial and profound argument for what lies on the inside forms t he core and matters most. In his day, Apess would have been familiar with the Great Chain of Being philosophy which privileges the Whites at the head of the human races and relegates the Other to occupy lower tiers. Whites used this concept to justify their subhuman treatment of other races. The irony of using skin color as a means to exalt oneself and debase another reveals the truth of the proverb, 'All that glitters is not gold.' In time, the surface of any object is defaced and gradually stripped away. External appearances deceive however, only nature is real and enduring. Apess reiterates: "I am not talking about the skin, but about principles." Apess makes a stirring appeal to the tenets of Christianity, the so-called White man's religion. White men would use their religion to validate conquest, segregation, and the institution of slavery, however, Apess wields the Holy Bible, the book which instructs Christians in defence of human rights, equality, justice and brotherhood. The Christian Bible quotes that "God is no respecter of persons"-"Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, with all thy soul, with all thy mind, and with all thy strength-Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself." "By this shall all men know that they are my disciples, if ye have love one to another." "Let us not love in word but in deed." Repeatedly Apess preaches to the people who should be acquainted with their own doctrines of love. Apess concept of God differs from the White man's God. Judging from the professing Christians' cruelty, greed, and antagonism, the Apess shows that according to the white man's principles, the Christian God wou ld have to be an unfair and hateful deity who would favor a cross section of people and belittle others. True religion in Apess' eyes is an inclusive religion. One which inspires love and compassion. Apess laments that in 'Christian America' there remains active practice of cruelty, systematic oppression, inhumanity and hostility. Apess argues that a Christian should never be a slave-owner for doing so puts at detriment his own soul and contravenes the founding principles of his faith. He urges the equality and brotherhood of Negroes and Whites according to the Christian doctrines and wonders at White Christian hypocrisy. To add force to his arguments, he quotes numerous scriptural texts from the Bible from Matthew, John and Romans. To hate and propagate division is not only unchristian but also unethical. God's unconditional and impartial love is a perfect example of the love that man must have for his fellow. Greed, selfishness and prejudice are the true motivators of discriminati on that have poisoned the heart, turning it from human compassion. Vices such as sloth, greed and materialism are other adverse effects of the White

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Implications of Information Technology in Developing Countries Essay Example for Free

Implications of Information Technology in Developing Countries Essay The survival and growth of organizations in an increasingly turbulent environment would depend upon effective utilization of information technology for aligning the organizational structure with environmental preferences and for creating symbiotic interorganizational structures. How can IT help the organizations in responding to the challenges of an increasingly complex and uncertain environment? How can IT help the organizations achieve the flexible organization structure? These are the topics that remains to be a matter of question for many developing countries. Although Information technology is still a . black box . technology for developing countries, it is largely applied in industrialised countries to the disadvantage of the majority of developing countries. This paper will try to illuminate the aspects and the impact of Information Technology in managing organizational change and its implications for developing countries. 1. Introduction The rate and magnitude of change are rapidly outpacing the complex of theories. economic, social, and philosophical on which public and private decisions are based. To the extent that we continue to view the world from the perspective of an earlier, vanishing age, we will continue to misunderstand the developments surrounding the transition to an information society, be unable to realize the full economic and social potential of this revolutionary technology, and risk making some very serious mistakes as reality and the theories we use to interpret it continue to diverge..-Arthur Cordell(1987). We have modified our environment so radically that we must modify ourselves in order to exist in this new environment..Norbert Wiener(1957) The survival and growth of organizations in an increasingly turbulent environment would depend upon effective utilization of information technology for aligning the organizational structure with environmental preferences and for creating symbiotic interorganizational structures. How can IT help the organizations in responding to the challenges of an increasingly complex and uncertain environment? How can IT help the organizations achieve the .flexible. organization structure? These are the topics that remains to be a matter of question for many developing countries. This study will try to illuminate the aspects and the impact of Information Technology in managing organizational change and its implications for developing countries. 2. Aspects of Information Technology Information technology (IT) may be defined as the convergence of electronics, computing, and telecommunications. It has unleashed a tidal wave of technological innovation in the collecting, storing, processing, transmission, and presentation of information that has not only transformed the information technology sector itself into a highly dynamic and expanding field of activity creating new markets and generating new investment, income, and jobs- but also provided other sectors with more rapid and efficient mechanisms for responding to shifts in demand patterns and changes in international comparative advantages, through more efficient production processes and new and improved products and services (e.g. replacing mechanical and electromechanical components, upgrading traditional products by creating new product functions, incorporating skills and functions into equipment, automating routine work, making technical, professional, or financial ser vices more transportable). The development of IT is intimately associated with the overwhelming advances recently accomplished in microelectronics. Based on scientific and technological breakthroughs in transistors, semiconductors, and integrated circuits (chips), micro-electronics is affecting every other branch of the economy, in terms of both its present and future employment and skill requirements and its future market prospects. Its introduction has resulted in a drastic fall in costs as well as dramatically improved technical performance both within the electronics industry and outside it (Malone and Rockart, 1993). The continuous rise in the number of features on a single micro-electronic chip has permitted lower assembly costs for electronic equipment (each chip replacing many discrete components), faster switching speeds (thus faster and more powerful computers), and more reliable, smaller, and lighter equipment (fewer interconnections, less power and material). Similar dramatic falls in costs occurred in the transport and steel industries in the nineteenth century and in energy in the twentieth, associated with the emergence of the third and fourth Kondratiev cycles, respectively. The potential effects of microelectronics are thus very far-reaching, for its use in production saves on virtually all inputs, ranging from skilled and unskilled labor to energy, materials, andcapital. All sectors of the economy have been influenced by the development of IT applications: information technology opens up greater opportunities for the exploitation of economies of scale and scope, allows the more flexible production and use of labor and equipment, promotes the internationalization of production and markets, offers greater mobility and flexibility in capital and financial flows and services, and is frequently the precondition for the creation of innovative financial instruments. Information system developments are constantly being applied to increase the productivity, quality, and efficiency of finance, banking, business management, and public administration. In manufacturing, and to some extent in agriculture, many processes have been automated, some requiring highly flexible, self-regulating machines, or robots. The engineering industry has been transformed by computer-aided design and three-dimensional computerized screen displays. The pace of technological change in IT will most likely accelerate the already observable growth in the interdependence of international relations not just economic or financial, but also political and cultural. National economies have become more susceptible to the effects of policy decisions taken at the international level, and domestic economic measures are having increased impacts on economic policies of other countries. World markets for the consumption of similar goods are growing, and so are common lifestyles across national borders. The advance of telecommunications and computerization has recently enabled large companies to use information systems to transmit technical and economic information among numerous computer systems at different geographical locations, subjecting widely dispersed industrial plants to direct managerial control from a central location; this affects the international division of labor and production and international trade, changing the patterns of industrial ownership and control, altering the competitive standing of individual countries, and creating new trading partners. It is the integration of functions that confers on information technology its real economic and social significance. More than just a gradual and incremental technological evolution leading to improved ways of carrying out traditional manufacturing processes (i.e. simply the substitution of new technologies for existing systems and the rationalization of standard activities), IT offers the opportunity for completely new ways of working through systems integration. Rather than applying one item of new technology to each of the production functions now performed at distinct stages of the production process, i.e. design, production, marketing, and distribution (in what could be called stand-alone improvements or island automation), having evolved in to new technologies, i.e. Enterprise Resource Planning systems, IT offers the possibility of linking design to production (e.g. through programmable manufacturing, measuring, and testing equipment responding to the codification of design), planning and design to marketing and distribution (e.g. through a variety of computer aids and databases that sense an d collect changing market trends), production to distribution (e.g. by automatically incorporating orders and commissions by customers and suppliers into the production process), etc. The complete integration of all these production subsystems in a synergistic ensemble is still more a long-term trend than a reality, but use of automated equipment to link together individual items of equipment belonging to hitherto discrete manufacturing operations has already made IT a strategic issue for industry. More technical advances are expected soon in the automation of telecommunications and the linkage of computers by data transmission that will enhance the possibilities of systems integration. Such programmable automation, or computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM), has the capability of integrating information processing with physical tasks performed by programmable machine tools or robots. CIM offers radical improvements in traditional problem areas confronting manufacturers, such as: reduced lead time for existing and new products; reduced inventories; more accurate control over production and better quality production management information; increased utilization of expensive equipment; reduced overhead costs; improved and consistent quality; more accurate forecasting; improved delivery performance (Miles et al., 1988). These features characterize information technology as a new technological system, in which far-reaching changes in the trajectories of electronic, computer, and telecommunication technologies converge and offer a range of new technological options to virtually all branches of the economy. Moreover, IT forms the basis for a reorganization of industrial society and the core of the emerging techno-economic paradigm. The reason for the pre-eminence of the new technological system clustered around information technology over the equally new technological systems clustered around new materials and biotechnology is the fact that information activities of one kind or another are a part of every activity within an industrial or commercial sector, as well as in our working and domestic lives. Almost all productive activities have high information intensity (some involve little else, such as banking or education). Further more, along with the premier of internet technology and e-business architectures; powerful concepts like inventory control, supply chain management, customer relationship/service management, and management resource planning through the internet under the name of Enterprise Resource Planning have enabled IT to be capable of offering strategic improvements in the productivity and competitiveness of virtually any socio-economic activity. Other than industrial or commercial sectors, information technology is also applicable in education sector and in public institutions. Thus, Information Technology is universally applicable. Probably only a fraction of the benefits derived from information technology-based innovations have so far been reaped and the rest remain to be acquired in the next decades. The shift towards systems integration to capitalize the full potential benefits of IT requires considerable adaptations, learning processes, and structural changes in existing socioecon omic institutions and organizational systems. The tradition in most current organizations is still to operate in a largely disintegrated fashion, reminiscent of the Ford-Taylorist management approaches that dominated the fourth Kondratiev cycle: high division of labor, increasing functional specialization/differentiation and de-skilling of many tasks, rigid manufacturing procedures and controls, long management hierarchies with bureaucratic decision-making procedures and a mechanistic approach to performance. Under these conditions, use of IT is restricted to piecemeal technology improvements. By contrast, information technology-based systems offer organizations the opportunity of functional integration, multi-skilled staff, rapid and flexible decision-making structures with greater delegation of responsibilities and greater autonomy of operating units, a more flexible and organic approach enabling a quick adjustment to changing environmental conditions. (Piore and Sabel, 1984.) But this means that information management skills require the ability to make choices about the optimal arrangements for particular situations: unlike earlier generations of technology, IT offers not a single best way of organization but a set of more or less appropriate alternative organizing, staffing, and managing options that may be adopted in different organizational contexts. There is no determinism in the way information technology influences the socioinstitutional framework. Therefore, organizational innovation is a crucial part of the requirement for firms to adapt to survive (Miles, 1988). Unfortunately, this is true for all the institutions as well. Further, it is even more dramatic for the organizations in developing countries because of not being able to properly adapt to this so-called .black-box. technology. No matter how frustrating it is interpreted for these countries, IT still has significant impact on their development. Although socio-economic structure of these countries resists organizational or institutional changes, the complex interrelations between these changes and information technologies have significant implications for the way IT does and will affect the societies and economies of developing countries. As a matter of fact, the negative and positive potential impacts of IT on these countries are a matter of great controversy among economists and politicians. The main short term issues usually discussed are the potential erosion of the comparative advantages of low labor costs, particularly in relation to assembly facilities, and the effects of automation, particularly on internal markets and international competitiveness. Implications of information technology for those countries hold great importance. 3. Implications for Developing Countries The first direct effect of the micro-electronics revolution was the location of production for export in third world countries. While production of mainframe computers continued to be located largely in industrialized countries, production of smaller computers and of microelectronic devices, more subject to price competition, was shifted to low-wage locations, mainly in East Asia, where countries presented low wage costs as well as political stability, a docile labor force, and government incentives. Location of production for local and regional consumption followed, but the countries concerned were mainly middle income: three quarters of US investment in third world micro-electronic industries was concentrated in 11 countries, namely the four Asian dragons, India, Thailand, Malaysia, the Philippines, Brazil, Mexico, and Colombia (Steward, 1991). Export-oriented investments in these countries were associated more with direct foreign investment from larger firms in industrialized countries than with firms producing for the local market; on the other hand, licensing was more associated with smaller firms (Tigre, 1995). The automation of production decreases the relative importance of labor-intensive manufacturing and cost of labor, thereby eroding the competitiveness of low labor costs. For instance, automation led to a sharp decrease in the difference between manufacturing costs of electronic devices between the United States and Hong Kong: in manual processes, manufacturing costs were three times higher in the United States, and the introduction of semi-automatic processes made the difference practically disappear (Sagasti, 1994). Equally, the expansion of automation in Japan has contributed to a reduction of Japanese investments in the Asia/Pacific region involving firms in electronics, assembly parts, and textiles (Sagasti, 1994). The trend to increasing systems optimization and integration is most likely to induce large producers in industrialized countries to bring back a significant share of their production located in developing countries (offshore production). This movement has been called comparative advantage reversal. As integration increases, with functions previously obtained by assembling pieces being incorporated in the electronic components, value-added is pushed out of assembly processes into the components themselves and upwards towards servicing. In addition, the growing technological complexity of electronic devices increases the value of the parts manufactured by firms located in industrialized countries The amount of value-added obtained in offshore assembly has thus been constantly decreasing (Sagasti,1994). Global factories constructed in locations of least cost, often at a considerable distance from final markets, were economically worthwhile because labor was one of the major determinants of costs. Technology and rapid responsiveness to volatile local markets are becoming more important components of competitiveness. The reduction of product cycles due to the growing resistance to obsolescence of programmable machines and equipment has led to a concentration of manufacturing investment in capital-intensive flexible manufacturing, further adding to the erosion of the comparative advantages of developing countries. The assembly of systems will probably continue in some developing countries that have adopted protective legislation for local production targeted at particular market segments (e.g. Brazil), although this is changing very rapidly (Steward, 1991). The types of equipment produced under these circumstances are used largely in internal markets and are hardly competitive on the international level; they tend to be far more expensive than comparable equipment available abroad, and often their installation and use are also more costly because of expensive auxiliary installations, under-use, and lack of management skills. Nevertheless, they may at least provide the country with the capacity to follow the development of information technologies more closely. In other countries, assembly of equipment is taking place from components bought practically off the shelf, but as the level of hardware integration and the amount of software incorporated into the chips (firmware) grow, valueadded will be taken away from the assembly process, reducing or eliminating its economic advantages. The introduction of microelectronics requires certain new skills of design, maintenance, and management, as well as complementary infrastructural facilities such as reliable telephone systems and power supplies. Deficiencies in these factors prevent the widespread adoption of information technology in developing countries (Munasinghe et al., 1985). The more advanced developing countries, with a wider basis of skills and infrastructure and a more flexible labor force, may be in a better position to adopt IT and to increase their productivity and their international competitiveness. But the less developed countries, with inadequate skills and infrastructure, low labor productivity, and lack of capital resources, will find it difficult to adopt the new technologies; they are likely to suffer a deterioration in international competitiveness vis-Ã  -vis both industrialized and the more advanced developing countries (Stewart et al., 1991). Quality, too, requires an adequate level of skills, infrastructure, and managerial know-how that is generally lacking in developing countries. This greatly reduces the synergies, number of options, faster responses, and more informed decisions that can be implemented in the firm by the optimization of the systems performance. In turn, the composition of the labor force existing within firms located in industrialized countries will further improve their systems performance and further reinforce the advantages derived from automation. The proportion of the labor force employed in production is constantly decreasing in the industrialized countries, implying that performances at the systems level and innovation, not manufacturing, are becoming the key to profit, growth, and survival (Sagasti, 1994). Like biotechnology, information technology is a proprietary technology, vital technical information regarding design engineering specification, process know-how, testing procedures, etc., being covered by patents or copyrights or closely held as trade secrets within various electronic firms from industrialized countries. Many companies in the software area do not patent or copyright their products because it entails disclosing valuable information, and firms are generally reluctant to license the more recent and advanced technologies. Therefore, technology transfer takes place mainly among established or important producers, hindering the access to developing countries. Moreover, the main issue facing developing countries is not so much the access to a particular technology but to the process of technological change, because of the dynamism of this process. Sagasti implies this issue in the book The Uncertain Guest: science, technology and development (1994) that recent trends in int er-firm relationships seem to indicate that this access takes place essentially through the participation in the equity of the company holding the technology.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Booker T Washington :: essays research papers

Booker T. Washington   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  In his day and age I believe that Booker T. Washington had the better approach to helping African Americans succeed in the United States. Washington believed that African Americans could win white acceptance eventually by succeeding economically. He did not believe in pointing at the constitution and demanding that everyone accept them as equals, but in earning the respect and acceptance of white people   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  In the later 1800’s and early 1900’s there was still widespread prejudice against African Americans and white people feared what educated black people might do. W.E.B. Du Bois wanted the most intelligent African Americans to lead their people forward in pursuit of civil rights, acceptance, and social and political equality. This approach to gaining equality would not work during that time. Actions like Du Bois insisted upon would have caused uprisings and potential violence. However, Washington’s ideas appealed to both African Americans and white people.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Washington told the African American population to set aside their desire for political and social acceptance and build up their economic security. He believed that a man of any race could find as much dignity and respect in tilling a field, or learning skill, as there was in writing a poem. Du Bois was reaching for something that was out of his reach at the time. There was still an underlying feeling that black people had taken white peoples land and jobs from them after the civil war. This was not an easy feeling to get rid of and standing up and demanding equality was not the right thing to do at the time.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  In conclusion, I believe that Booker T. Booker T Washington :: essays research papers Booker T. Washington   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  In his day and age I believe that Booker T. Washington had the better approach to helping African Americans succeed in the United States. Washington believed that African Americans could win white acceptance eventually by succeeding economically. He did not believe in pointing at the constitution and demanding that everyone accept them as equals, but in earning the respect and acceptance of white people   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  In the later 1800’s and early 1900’s there was still widespread prejudice against African Americans and white people feared what educated black people might do. W.E.B. Du Bois wanted the most intelligent African Americans to lead their people forward in pursuit of civil rights, acceptance, and social and political equality. This approach to gaining equality would not work during that time. Actions like Du Bois insisted upon would have caused uprisings and potential violence. However, Washington’s ideas appealed to both African Americans and white people.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Washington told the African American population to set aside their desire for political and social acceptance and build up their economic security. He believed that a man of any race could find as much dignity and respect in tilling a field, or learning skill, as there was in writing a poem. Du Bois was reaching for something that was out of his reach at the time. There was still an underlying feeling that black people had taken white peoples land and jobs from them after the civil war. This was not an easy feeling to get rid of and standing up and demanding equality was not the right thing to do at the time.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  In conclusion, I believe that Booker T.

Monday, January 13, 2020

Junior High School Essay

The K to 12 Program covers Kindergarten and 12 years of basic education (six years of primary education, four years of Junior high school, and two years of Senior high school) to provide sufficient time for tmastery of concepts and skills, develop lifelong learners, and prepare garduaes for the tertiary education, middle-levels skills development, employment, and entreprenuership. The K+12 educational program is perceived by the Aquino administration as the â€Å"long term solution to poverty. † This program aims to give every student a quality education that will make them globally competitive. This will be done by decongesting the curricilum and using quality materials for learning such as textbooks. Aside from this, high quality teacher will be given priority. High standards will also be set in Mathematics, English and Science in all levels. Thus eliminating the perception the highschool education is preparatory for college. ISSUES AND CONCERNS One of the major campaign platform of Pres. Aquino is the K to 12 educational program and it is also one of the most controversial initiatives. On May 15, President Aquino signed into law the program mandating Filipino pupils to attend kindergarten, six years of elementary school education, four years of junior high school and two years of senior high school. The signing officially ended the country’s 10-year basic education cycle, which now exists only in Angola and Djibouti. K to 12 hopes to decongest the curriculum, by spreading lessons over 12 years, instead of cramming them into 10. K to 12 hopes to do away with college remedial classes, by improving the quality of high-school instruction. K to 12 hopes to protect the rights of Filipino children who, at 18, are legally and emotionally still kids, unprepared for work or university.. Some problems that abound with K to 12: Lack of family, school, government resources; the herculean task of implementation; the need to address more urgent concerns such as early and massive dropouts. Many schools are currently not ready for Grades 11 and 12. Aside from lack of classrooms, their teachers are not trained to handle higher-level subjects, like calculus for students who want to major in the sciences in university. K to 12 would be far more difficult to implement in already overcrowded and poorly equipped public schools, where many teachers are insufficiently trained, classes are often held in multiple shifts and most students struggle to make ends meet. The biggest problem of K to 12 has always been, and will always be, the cost. Even if public education is free, families have to spend for transportation and supplies. An additional two years is a burden for most Filipino families, who want their children to finish school quickly so they can work.

Sunday, January 5, 2020

The Sport Of Powerlifting Is Serious - 981 Words

â€Å"212 on deck!† At this moment, I can hardly stand still while I wait for my turn to lift. I’ve been up since early this morning and have been waiting a couple of hours for my weight class to start. There have been weeks of preparation just for this one day, the first of many for the season. The sport of powerlifting is serious and the only way to be at the top of your class is to practice, increase your lifted weigh and be prepared. Most people have limited knowledge of this sport, like I did when I first began competing. However, once you find yourself at a powerlifting meet, there is no going back. The sport is friendly yet competitive. For some, placing in their weight class is all that matters. Meanwhile, others are focused on increasing their bench, squat or deadlift to beat their current best. At this moment, all that matters to me is that I get all my lifts today. Weeks later, everything about powerlifting meets seemed ordinary, I had begun to learn the ropes. After weigh in, you could always find my team eating some sort of food involving peanut butter. During this time, our coach took the opportunity to run through the basics with us. Which weight classes everyone was in, which rack they would compete in, who was wrapping knees and the starting weights. Then each athlete would have a moment to state their goal for the day. Looking back now, this was our coach’s way of allowing us to have control over our performance. For me, this goal setting was incrediblyShow MoreRelatedSteroids Is A Synthetic Form Of The Male Hormone Testosterone And Can Help Your Body1151 Words   |  5 PagesDominic Muscari AC English 12 Hendricks 3/14/16 Steroids in Sports Do you know what proper steroid use can do for you in sports? Steroids are a synthetic form of the male hormone testosterone and can help your body be the best that it can be and improve your game. Steroids have been used as early as 776 BC in the original Olympic Games by the ancient Greeks to enhance their performance. There are many different forms of this drug some you take by mouth and some you have to inject and when usedRead MoreEssay Athletes And Drug Use1690 Words   |  7 PagesAthletes And Drug Use Many people believe that drug use in professional athletics is not a serious problem, however it is more widespread and serious than people think. In professional athletics the use of drugs is looked upon as somewhat of a serious problem, but is also very discrete and low key. Every once in a while one might see a prominent figure in a certain sport being reprimanded for the use of some outlawed drug, however this is just one of the many who happened to get caught. AthletesRead MorePerformance Enhancing Drug Abuse1511 Words   |  7 Pagesand other teens in athletics bring to the less physically fortunate adolescents. Coaches want the biggest and best kids to play their sport. Therefore causing the teens that want to excel in that particular sport such as football or Powerlifting, the teen or the athlete will do all they can to make the weight or be able to move the guy in front of him in his sport, if they cannot do this on their own he or she will feel insecure, helping to enco urage making the turn to performance enhancing drugs